Holistic Birth and Parenting Blog

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Thrive Birth Center Blog, Thrive Birth Talk

Introducing Solids; What, When & How, with Tessa Mancini Gillen

Finally, we made it. Six months. This milestone feels big, somehow bigger than the others. Life is starting to feel light again, and we have somehow transitioned from the deep and dark room of newborn land to a much sweeter space of existence. With all the light and joy that this milestone brings, introducing food may be one of the bigger highlights. Breast Milk has been the cornerstone for this human’s existence. And for good reason. Full of fatty acids, antibodies, nutrients, protein, and fat, it truly is the perfect food. It also contains quite a bit of sugar, making your baby’s introduction to food a sweet, satiating one. Have you ever wondered why Breast Milk is so sweet? I used to believe that it was full of sugar to send the signal to our brain that it was a safe food, and yes, please eat more: positive feedback. And while this still rings true, a deeper understanding leads me to include the role of sugar being necessary for feeding our gut microbiome, the true cornerstone for health. Our gut health affects our mood, our ability to digest food, assimilate nutrients, and eliminate waste and toxins. Our gut health can be a huge indicator for which diseases we will be susceptible to later in life, including diabetes, obesity, asthma, allergies, autoimmune disorders, and more. 90% of serotonin (the happiness hormone) is made in the digestive tract, over 70% of our immune system resides in the gut, and at birth we are starting from scratch. Newborns have a gut free from bacteria, which begins to populate with hundreds of thousands of microbes, critical bacteria that will have lasting impacts on your child’s health. These bacteria need one thing to thrive and survive. Sugar. Which is conveniently found in perfect proportions in Breast Milk, the perfect baby food. But there does come a time when your baby’s nutritional needs will increase, and solids will need to join the party.

Introducing solid food too early can increase the risk for developing allergies and intolerances. Your baby’s digestive tract is not equipped to handle most foods until around 6 months, when digestive enzymes begin to develop. Without these enzymes, your baby is unable to digest most whole foods. In Ayurvedic tradition, babies are given small amounts of spices (cumin, coriander, cinnamon, amchur, sumac) on the tongue to help increase these necessary enzymes and begin to build-up the digestive fire.

As intestines begin to mature, they secrete the protein immunoglobulin A (IgA), which acts like a protective paint for your baby’s developing digestive tract. IgA not only coats the digestive tract, it prevents the passage of harmful allergens into your baby’s system. This protective IgA exists in very low numbers in the early months and does not reach its peak production until 7 months of age. As the digestive tract matures and develops, the body is better able to become nutritionally selective, filtering out offending allergens, making this a great time to start introducing some gentle, safe whole-food options.

While many parents introduce oatmeal and rice cereal right around this time, it may not be as beneficial as once thought. Around 6 months of age babies nutritional needs go up, including iron and zinc, neither of which exist naturally in fortified rice cereal. Also, these tiny digestive systems are still developing, and with limited enzymes available, grains can be tough for babies to digest. In fact, it can take over 2 years for the enzyme amylase to really kick into gear, which is needed to break down both rice and oatmeal. If there is no amylase, there is no break-down, leading to discomfort and irritation for the wee ones. No thanks, I’d rather introduce REAL unprocessed foods, foods that contain all the necessary enzymes and minerals to benefit my babies growing nutritional needs. And I’ll take that without the discomfort and irritation.

So you are 6 months in and your baby is eager to eat some REAL food. What should come first? Surveying other cultures around the globe, the answer isn’t clear-cut. There are many different approaches that share the underlying theme of introducing REAL food. In Oceania, the Yafars chew up fish and then feed it along with liver to their babies. The first foods for Inuit babies include seaweed and “nuk-tuk” (seal blubber) and in Puerto Rico, common first foods include potatoes, mashed boiled plantains, rice, mangos, and many other tropical vegetables and fruits. In Indonesia, babies are given rice pudding mixed with liver and veggies, and in Japan babies are given miso soup, and raw fish is given to babies under 2 years of age. Herbal teas are frequently given to babies around the world, and all of these variations in infant feeding help to show us that there is never just one way to introduce solids. Make your babies first bite flavorful and nutrient dense, and choose real, organic and non-refined options.

Here are a few ideas to get you going:

When introducing new foods or spices, wait 3 days between new introductions, and be mindful of any food allergy symptoms.

Common Food Allergy Symptoms Include:
1. diarrhea/ constipation
2. vomiting
3. swollen face
4. rash/ skin irritation
5. wheezing

Common Allergenic Foods:
1. dairy
2. soy
3. peanuts & tree nuts
4. shellfish
5. wheat
6. eggs

Foods To Be Delayed Until At Least 1 Year Of Age:
1. Honey
2. Nuts/Nut butter (There are mixed reviews on this. Some studies say introduce early and some say wait. There is no definitive answer.)
3. Shellfish
4. Cows milk. Between 9-12 months, fermented dairy may be ok. The fermentation breaks down the milk lactose into simple sugars, which are more easily absorbed.

First foods to introduce:

Banana: Conveniently contain amylase, an enzyme needed to break down carbohydrates that is not present yet in babies digestive systems.

Pear: Known to be anti-allergenic, pears also offer digestive support in alleviating your baby’s constipation. Pears (cooked) are known to be very gentle on a baby’s stomach, making it a good choice for those with reflux.

28522_396366871515_2228200_nAvocado: One of nature’s perfect foods for babies, this gem is easily digested and contains over 25 essential nutrients including iron, copper, magnesium, and essential fatty acids that help the body to function optimally. Avocados also help the body to assimilate and absorb these key nutrients, truly optimizing your baby’s nutrition.

Nettle: Introducing nettles provides your baby with a good boost of iron, not to mention a whole tool-box full of vitamins and minerals. Nettle also contains acetylcholine, which is necessary for optimal brain development, and essential fatty acids, making this earthy green superfood a true whole body vitalizer. Try pureeing fresh nettle leaves with a touch of breastmilk (until smoothly processed), or simply make a tea.

For more information on introducing solids, and some clever ideas on how to get the essential vitamins and minerals into your growing baby, join me for Introducing Solids; Baby’s First Bite at the Thrive Birth Center. April 16th, 12-2 pm

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Thrive Birth Center Blog, Thrive Birth Talk

Where You Birth Matters, Part Three: Are Birth Centers Safe?

With the upcoming screening of the locally produced documentary Why Not Home? The Surprising Birth Choices of Physicians and Nurses, we thought it was a good time to have a community conversation about the importance of birth location. 

In Part Three of this series, Melissa Wiseman, LM, CPM, looks at why the studies show us that birth centers are not only safe but ideal for low risk families. Enjoy! 

Are Birth Center’s Safe? A look at the studies, your choice, and why it works! 

More and more families are seeking the care of midwives for their pregnancy and birth. Some preferring hospital birth with Nurse-Midwives and others choosing home birth or birth center care with Licensed Midwives. The choice of where you give birth is highly personal and is based on your own set of values, ideas and knowledge about birth. We give birth where we feel safe and despite the past century of being told that hospital birth is the safest place for birth to occur, women who give birth in free standing birth centers are experiencing much better outcomes.

A recent article Maternal Outcomes in Birth Centers: an integrative review of the literature presented maternal outcomes from 23 quantitative and 9 qualitative studies of 84,300 births planned to occur in freestanding birth centers throughout the United States and internationally.   The outcomes were certainly favorable for healthy, low-risk women who choose to give birth at a freestanding birth center. These positive outcomes included higher rates of vaginal birth and lower rate of cesarean birth, greater perineal integrity and fewer episiotomies, less use of oxytocin for labor augmentation, and less use of epidural or other pharmacologic pain management. A review of this magnitude is a highly valuable comparison tool, especially if you are pregnant and deciding whether a hospital or birth center or home birth is right for you.

In addition to this study, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recently released a statement that healthy low-risk women should be supported in their choice to give birth in birth centers. So, what is it about birth centers that promote better outcomes for you and your baby?

Midwifery Care provided in birth centers

Women report greater satisfaction with the comprehensive and individualized care and a more egalitarian relationship with their midwives, where a personal connection helped them to engage and be an active participant in their care. When we provide you with unbiased information, access to high quality clinical care and ample opportunities to make your own choices, then will we really see superior outcomes for both you and baby. professional-bubble

A place where your choices are respected

Women who are respected as the prime decision maker throughout her and her baby’s care feel a greater sense of empowerment. Becoming an empowered voice in your care and in the care of your baby is essential as you transition into parenthood. We encourage you to be engaged and active participants in your care, and in turn your midwives trust and respect the informed choices the you make.

 

IMG_0741-Edit-1200x800It is a home away from home

Birth Centers are home-like environment that is set up specifically to promote uninterrupted, natural birth. Birth suites are often spacious with a large tub, should you choose to labor or birth in the water. The layout is created to ensure safety and privacy during birth, each piece of furniture carefully chosen for both comfort and function, and our cabinets are stocked and organized to hold the necessities for labor and birth.

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Out of sight, not out of reach

In birth centers, your midwives give you the room to labor and give birth without pressure to submit to common interventions such as pharmaceutical labor induction, augmentation and epidural pain management. These are still accessible, but do require a short car ride to the hospital to obtain. Because these options are associated with risk of further interventions and cesarean section, they are best used when only absolutely necessary. To promote the most physiologic birth and best possible outcomes, healthy low-risk women should have the opportunity to go into labor when their baby and body is ready. They should also have the space to labor and give birth on her own terms with the watchful guidance of skilled midwives through the process.

 

But what if something goes wrong?

Complications can arise in labor and birth and such is life, we don’t drive with our airbags out just in case they don’t do their job and inflate on impact. And it certainly doesn’t mean a healthy low-risk woman needs to give birth in the hospital “just in case”. Because midwives are experts in normal birth, midwives are especially good at identifying patterns in labor that are not following the normal progression for birth. Remember, there are yellow lights before there are red lights. With the undivided attention your midwife, she can address issues that might arise in a timely and dignified manner. You are the number one priority of your birth team! As midwives, we are readily equipped to treat some of the more common complications that may arise in labor, birth or in the immediate postpartum. If there are more complex or emergent issues, we are able to make a timely transition to the hospital.

 

 

The choice around where to give birth is only for you to make. But the tides are starting to turn as we are seeing our health care system encouraging healthy, low risk women to seek birth center care. And why? Because our mamas, our babies and our outcomes are strong.

~Melissa Wiseman is a licensed midwife practicing at Thrive, Ultimate Frisbee enthusiast, and all around birth nerd. 

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Thrive Birth Center Blog

Where You Birth Matters, Part Two: Water Birth

We are excited to launch our new blog series Where You Birth Matters.

With the upcoming screening of  the locally produced documentary Why Not Home? The Surprising Birth Choices of Physicians and Nurses, we thought it was a good time to have a community conversation about the importance of birth location. In this series, we’ll take a comprehensive look at birthing locations and outcomes, including the hormonal process, the safety of out-of-hospital birth and associated studies, obstacles around fees and access, and ways families can afford a supported birth experience. Plus, we’ll let you hear directly from families about why they value and fought hard for a birth experience that should be everyone’s right~ safe, supported, and dignified.

In Part Two of this series, we are bringing back a past blog piece on water birth. Midwife Bee Lauher looks at why and how water birth works as well as busting a few myths. 

Where You Birth Matters, Part Two: The Wisdom Of Water Birth

When a laboring woman steps into the birth tub the atmosphere changes, voices quiet and the softness of her body is noticeable.

Midwives have known for decades that warm water is one of the most powerful tools we have in reducing pain and tension in child birth. And yet, in the medical model of care, we are still seeing fear and resistance to letting women soak their bodies in water during labor and birth.

Recently, I was in Indonesia meeting with an Obstetrician and his group of students at a local hospital. We were discussing the differences between maternity care in the U.S. verses Indonesia. He asked, somewhat startled, “You don’t do water birth do you?” I replied, “Of course, more than half of the births I attend are water births.” His jaw dropped a little and he said, “You let babies eat their mom’s poop!” The table erupted in laughter. It was funny, but it also reflected that the medical world is still in the dark about the safety and benefits of hydrotherapy in birth.

The majority of hospitals in California will allow a laboring Mama to get in the shower for short periods between of time while being connected to a hospital bed for electronic fetal monitoring. Rarely are you able to be in active labor in the shower, and if you are blessed to find a hospital that offers a birthing tub, it is unlikely that you will be allowed to birth in it.

Midwives are skillfully trained in the art of monitoring fetal heart tones in any position, in any room. We use water proof hand held dopplers which allows us to keep a close eye (or ear) on your baby while you are in the tub.

There are many myths revolving around the risks of water birth. The primary myth is that the baby will take a breath underwater and aspirate fluid into the lungs. Rather, a healthy baby that has been thriving during labor and born into the water will be perfectly safe and will not inhale water due to the design of their throat. The larynx has 5 times more taste buds then the tongue does, which allows it to interpret solutions as they hit the back of the throat. As the solution passes the larynx the taste buds will signal the glottis to automatically close, while at the same time swallowing anything in the mouth. This automatic response is called the Dive Reflex. All healthy active babies have one. Indeed, it is believed that infants are born with this reflex so that they can easily breastfeed and not inhale milk.

IMG_4418[1] copyBy facilitating mobility and reducing stress related hormones, while at the same time increasing oxytocin and endorphins (which neutralize pain and encourage a trance like state during labor), midwives have have seen and experienced the following benefits of water birth:

• Enables the mother to assume any position which is comfortable for labor and birth
• Speeds up labor
• Reduces blood pressure
• Gives mother more control of body
• Provides significant pain relief
• Promotes relaxation
• Conserves her energy
• Reduces the need for drugs
• Gives mother a private and protected space
• Causes the perineum to become more elastic and relaxed, reducing the incidence and severity of tearing and the need for an episiotomy and stitches
• Reduces cesarean section rates and transports to the hospital for pain management
• Encourages an easier birth for mother and a gentler welcome for baby

It is a common belief that because babies have been happily floating in warm water for the last 40 weeks or so that birthing a baby into the water ensures a smooth and gentle transition into life with gravity. These babies are less likely to be stressed by a harsh environment. They are more likely to be born into their Mama’s hands, quietly, gently, and peacefully.

Of course, there are situations that are not ideal for a water birth. Each mama and each baby are different and require individualized care to create a birth plan for you.

For more information about water birth or the benefits of laboring in water, contact Thrive. We are more then happy to discuss your birthing options!
Love, Bee Lauher, LM, CPM

*For more information the birth photographer who can took the photo above, please contact Seana Burglund and see her website here.

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Thrive Birth Center Blog

Where You Birth Matters, Part One: Oxytocin

 

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Oxytocin: the Hormone of Trust and Community

By Kelly Gray

You might already know that oxytocin plays a major role in the process of childbirth and breastfeeding. This birth-related hormone is responsible for the uterus pulling itself up to thicken the fundus so that the baby can be released. In other words, oxytocin contracts the uterus. When labor is undisturbed, oxytocin will flood the laboring woman’s body with a euphoric feeling while decreasing stress hormones. After labor, oxytocin helps with the let-down of the mother’s breast milk, as well as facilitate mother-baby bonding.

But, it’s even more nuanced than that.

Oxytocin is the body’s messenger of love, and that means a lot. It is produced in the hypothalamus and released via the pituitary gland. It flows through the blood of humans when they feel connected, intimate, and safe. Whether you are in your lover’s arms, nursing your newborn infant, or laughing with your best friend, your body releases oxytocin, which allows you to deepen your connection to those around you. Under its influence, we might experience the feeling that we often describe as love. What is that sweet restful feeling after an orgasm? What is that warm rush mothers get while breastfeeding? Or the need to hold your baby when you hear her cry? It’s oxytocin!

Scientists have identified oxytocin as having a major role in our ability to build community and form morality, all based on a unique transaction that happens between humans: TRUST. What’s really interesting about trust and oxytocin is that it’s largely built upon non-verbal cues and it’s a two way street. Oxytocin allows us to read another person’s non-verbal cues and decide whether we trust them and discern whether they trust us. If someone displays cues that they don’t trust us, our oxytocin lowers. Fortunately, if someone lets us know they trust us, that’s the foundation for a good relationship and our oxytocin flows. Oxytocin is literally the hormonal building block for relationships, family and community.

Thus, where we give birth and who we invite into the birth room affect our oxytocin levels, which in turn affect our experience of childbirth. For instance, if your provider looks at you while grimacing and says, “You’re making a baby that is too big for your body, we’ll need to talk about scheduling an induction or cesarean”, this will decrease your oxytocin levels. At the core of this statement, your provider is expressing distrust in your body’s ability to birth your baby. In reaction, your oxytocin production decreases and you might not trust your provider, or worse, your body. This additional stress might even affect your ability to spontaneously go into labor. On the other hand, when your midwife smiles at you and says, “Your body is perfect and your baby is perfect,” your oxytocin production surges. You build an intimate relationship that supports spontaneous labor that feels manageable and secure.

During birth, oxytocin aides in contracting your uterus, which allows your womb to pull up so that your baby can enter your birth canal and be born. The closer a laboring woman gets to having a baby, the stronger her contractions are, and the more oxytocin she has in her body. Her sensitivity to non-verbal cues is heightened, and the need for trust is even more crucial.

As support people, it is paramount to think of the laboring woman as having super human skills in reading non-verbal cues. Best intentions aside, what we tell her non-verbally affects her body and emotions. A provider who is peaking too loudly, too many interruptions or observers, or a partner who is jittery will have a profound impact on the progress of labor. When stressed, the laboring woman’s body will decrease her oxytocin production. In contrast, think of the woman who hears, “You are doing beautifully,” or “Take your time”, or sees her doula smiling from the corner of the room. She will feel her contractions strengthen and her euphoria surge. If she feels her partner’s arms embracing her while she sways in the candle lit room, she feel protected and safe and allowed to walk towards the intensity of birth. When her vocalizations are met with knowing nods, and her uncomfortability is met with enthusiasm, she can feel trust at the core of her experience. In turn, trust and connection will protect her body and her baby as her labor becomes stronger, and her contractions become longer and closer together. Since having longer, stronger and closer contractions is the only way to have your baby, why not have them from a place of euphoria?

Sexuality can teach us a lot about birth, the dance between intensity and euphoria, welcoming the peak of the experience, the need for trust, connection and consent. An orgasm is physiologically and emotionally very similar to that of a contraction. In both, you will find the need to relax, release, and allow them to surge through you on the bridge that links the mind and body. That bridge is built from the hormones of labor, particularly oxytocin.

Sports research shows that emotional transference, when one person’s emotions are redirected to another’s emotions through non-verbal cues, is oxytocin induced. Sports research also shows us that oxytocin increases under physical activity. The euphoric feeling experienced from playing with a team that you trust is real, and oxytocin allows players to build a cohesive unit based on positive emotions that enhance their game.

It’s not just where or with whom we birth that will determine our ability to get our oxytocin going. Culturally, we have a relationship that is suspicious of the woman’s body and her ability to move through her biological initiations like menstruation, birth or menopause with ease and joy. At large, we often go to places to birth our babies that we associate with sickness and death with emergencies that feel out of our control (and all our cultural confusion over those normal experiences). Often, due to cultural narratives that we inherit, we feel shame, fear and distrust around our bodies, gender or sex. Sometimes, our ability to create oxytocin is hindered by past traumatic experiences, mental health or autoimmune disorders.

What I really want you to know about oxytocin is that oxytocin allows you to fall in love with your newborn and understand all of his non-verbal cues. It’s at the core of our first human experience: having our needs met by our family. When the oxytocin cycle is interrupted, such as when synthetic oxytocin (Pitocin) is given to the laboring woman, we see Moms who might struggle with milk production, postpartum depression, and are challenged to read their little one’s non-verbal cues. Synthetic hormones can decrease or even turn off our naturally producing hormones. This affects not only mothers and babies, but also all of the mother’s relationships. We know that medical interventions can be life saving, and sometimes, we must take risks like introducing Pitocin into the birth experience. If we do, we must determine if it is medically necessary so that you can trust the intervention. That’s worth repeating: to trust the intervention through the process of informed consent. We must be mindfully aware of all the ways we can strengthen our oxytocin experience during the intervention and afterwards. Protecting the hormonal loop is one of the greatest steps that we can take to protect the human experience and all that it has to offer: safety, connection, trust and love.

What can we do before, during and after birth to get oxytocin going? This is my go-to list, but feel free to add your own to it.

  1. Choose a birth team and location that you trust, and talk to them about what makes you feel safe and connected.
  2. Take a childbirth class out of the hospital that focuses on the mind~body connection, advocacy and evidence based birth practices.
  3. Hug, laugh and take a walk with a trusted friend.
  4. Participate in Community: attend a rally for a cause you believe in, go to a hip-hop show or the opera, sit with others in the presence of the divine, join a community garden or neighborhood project. Connect.
  5. Meditate, practice yoga, get acupuncture.
  6. Massage, make love, masturbate, feel sexy~ but only if you want to, otherwise it won’t work!
  7. Understand informed consent and be prepared to advocate for it- Childbirth Connection is a great resource for the legal rights of the childbearing woman.
  8. Ask your birth partner to become educated about the hormones of birth and their unique role in protecting your birth experience.
  9. Sing, Dance, Chant, Make Art; cultivate your creativity without inhibition!
  10. A daily practice of Positive Birth Affirmations: I trust myself, I trust my body, I trust my baby.
  11. Hold your baby, nurse your baby, and look into her eyes. Tell her that you love her, and let her know that you know that she loves you, too. Repeat, repeat, to infinity, repeat.

 

 

Suggested reading for those who crave more information:

Sports research and oxytocin

Oxytocin and trust research

Dr. Sarah Buckley on the Hormones of Labor

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Practitioners, Staff

Welcoming our new student midwife, Batya!

The cycle of midwifery continues at Thrive. Come the first week of February, we are honored and excited to welcome Batya Friedland into the Thrive family as one of our apprentice midwives. We’ve been smitten with Batya since meeting her and reading her beautiful website (which we encourage you to check out).  Batya is a world traveler, scholar, Rabbi, Buddhist Chaplain, dancer and poet. Our center coordinator Kelly was able to ask Batya a few questions about what gets her going, her visions of life and midwifery care, and what she does to make herself smile. Enjoy!

Kelly: Tell me about the moment you knew you were going to be a midwife?
Batya: 3 1/2 years ago I was in a very challenging point in my life. I had gone so far into the void of experience that I could not feel the meaning of my life. From that place, I received a vision of myself catching a baby. I didn’t even know the phrase ‘catching a baby’. I had never experienced anything like it, and the potency of it was so strong that I knew that is what I am here to do. Without having been to a birth, I enrolled in midwifery school 5 months later.

Kelly: What do you think makes a good midwife and who are the people you have looked up to?
Batya: I believe a midwife is someone who genuinely loves other people, and naturally cares about their well being. Midwives have all different personalities, but beneath the personality we are a beautiful gathering of gatekeepers; a welcome committee of high . A midwife is a witness, and attends to what is needed for the sake of health, happiness, and love. Though a midwife must have excellent self-care, the role itself is to benefit others and truly be of service. Midwives that have impacted my life are Selena Green, Ina May Gaskin, Elizabeth Davis, Terri Nash, and Angelina Martinez Miranda.

Kelly: If you could change one thing about maternity care in the US what would it be?
Batya: The cesarean rate is an emergency for the birth world and humanity. 1/3 births currently in the US are cesarean, and depending on which statistics you consider, only 12% of those are truly medically needed. This is what I would change.

Kelly: Our clients are always excited to know additional skills that our students and staff midwives have. Tell us about your skills outside of attending births?
Batya: I am a rabbi and buddhist chaplain, and am also an energy healing practitioner. I speak Spanish, Mandarin, Hebrew and Thai, and also offer placenta preparation and birth related ceremony. I also bring the skill of humor!

Kelly: Tell me how you make yourself happy when you are not at a birth.
Batya: I’m singing! I’m drumming! I’m communing with the ocean, I’m hiking. I’m playing the shruti box, my ukulele, writing poetry, and leading meditation retreats. I’m involved in a ritual somewhere. And overall loving my life.unnamed

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Staff

An Interview with an Apprentice Midwife

At the end of the year, having student midwives at Thrive is bittersweet. They’ve caught babies, they’ve smiled into mamas eyes, they’ve held the hands of partners, they’ve cleaned a few birth rooms. They are trusted team players who are leaving the center to support other communities. Typically, student midwives are new to midwifery. However, this last year, we could not have been luckier to practice along side a student midwife with fifteen years of experience. How can this be, you might ask? You’ll have to read the interview with Serena Russel. Serena, we are sad to see you go, we thank you for your insights and hard work, and we wish you well in building your practice in Grass Valley and Nevada City! You can see Serena’s beautiful website here and please feel free to leave her a note in the comment section. We know she touched many people’s hearts as their families were born.

 

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Kelly:  Tell me about the moment that you absolutely knew you were meant to be a midwife?
Serena: It started out with my ravenous hunger for knowledge and information on natural and normal birth when I became pregnant with my daughter at 18. Once I had her at home, with the guidance of my amazing midwives who continually and unwaveringly trusted and supported me, that knowledge became power and I felt compelled to share and inspire other women with this knowledge. This led me to midwifery.

Kelly: Tell me about your path to becoming a licensed midwife?
Serena: This is a long and winding one! Once I decided midwifery was my path (right after my daughter was born in 93), I started with self study and then attended a midwifery intensive for 3 months. This was in 94/95 before CA had licensing available for midwives, meaning it was a renegade path. The midwife who taught the class was very outspoken and she inspired me to always stay committed to my goal of supporting women. I apprenticed in a home birth setting for a few years. My mentor was trained by a granny midwife in Tennessee and passed on the deep trust and wisdom that comes with knowing your stuff and knowing when to use it~ and when not to use it! I started catching babies for friends in 99, but ultimately decided that I could use some high volume experience. I went to Jamaica to volunteer and train at a high volume birth center run by the well known midwifery mama, Shari Danials. I spent 6 weeks there and came home after 40 births and a plethora of clinicals. Slowly, I started my small practice with the idea that licensing, with all the protocols and requirements, would ultimately hold me back from my ability to truly work for my clients. I practiced for years this way, balancing single motherhood with midwifery, all the while knowing that one wrong step and I could go to jail for a felony. I kept diligent paperwork, wrote informed consents, attended peer review and followed local peer protocol. This was exhausting and it kept my practice very small. In 2013 the midwifery law went up for review and in January 2014 many aspects of it changed. Most importantly,  the concept of a woman’s right to self determination changed. For me, this meant I was no longer covered by my diligent claims of being unlicensed. So, I decided it was time to join the licensed model and through that decision realized it would also offer me an ability to be available to more types of women and families.
I enrolled in NMI and realized that after almost 15 years of primary practice, I had very little documentation I could use to prove my skills. This led me to the frustrating awareness that I would need to apprentice… again. Thats when I found out that Thrive Birth Center was looking for apprentices. Knowing the ladies from peer review, I emailed them and communicated my situation and found them to be surprisingly receptive. I arranged to start in an advanced student role in march 2015. Having been primarily home birth trained and experienced, I found the birth center to be a bit confusing at first. Electronic charting, digital b/p cuffs and an entirely different client load than I was used to was slightly intimidating but Jasmine and Caitlin were patient and friendly and took the time to explain everything. The other student showed me the ropes and quickly my insecurity shifted as I felt very much a part of the team. The collegial nature of my experience at Thrive brought perspective into my own ways of practice and expanded my ability to midwife all types of women in a comfortable and gentle manner.

Kelly: Wow, you really went from student midwife to experienced midwife back to the student roll again. What was the most challenging aspect of being an apprentice?

Serena: I think being on-call all the time while juggling the need to take care of my other responsibilities, like paying bills, making money and household tasks, was the most challenging piece of apprenticing as a midwife. It’s a lot of work and selfless service, and yet its also very rewarding.

Kelly: What was the most rewarding aspect of apprenticeship?
Serena: I loved that every single new mom and baby that comes into this world is gently and well cared for by their providers at Thrive. Also, working with the amazing midwives at the center, not to mention the work we brought to more traditional home settings.

Kelly: Now that your apprenticeship is complete, how do you plan on bringing these skills back into your communities?
Serena: After so many years coming, I feel really great about entering into this new phase of being a licensed midwife. I’ve just relocated to Grass Valley and am really excited to offer midwifery care to home birth mamas in the community. I love the water birth model at Thrive and I am purchasing a birth tub to include in my practice. I’d also like to create educational opportunities for families about the safety of home birth, VBAC, and healthy lifestyles for preconception. In addition, I plan on offering Holistic well woman care, and in- home-fertility support including IUI.

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Thrive Birth Center Blog, Thrive Birth Talk

Understanding the Psoas: The Muscle of the Soul

By Lyla Moore

The psoas (so-as) muscle is actually a pair of muscles found deep within the core. It originates from the lumbar region of the spine (middle low back) and wraps around into the pelvic area, attaching at the hip with the help of several strong tendons. In animals, we call this muscle the tenderloin. Ilio-Psoas

From a physical standpoint, the psoas is responsible for stabilizing the base of the spine. When the muscle is tight or injured, we experience low back pain, sciatica, disc problems, hip degeneration, knee, and pelvic pain. It is engaged when we are sitting, running and walking. As you lift your knee to take a step, the psoas contracts. As the leg swings back, as it does while running, it lengthens the muscle. If you sit for long periods of time, the psoas remains in a contracted state, and this can lead to habituated tightness. During pregnancy, the tone of the psoas can effect the decent of the baby and even fetal position. Maintaining a healthy psoas eliminates low back pain and leg pains, opens and centers the pelvis and hips, which ultimately can support you in bringing your baby into the world with more ease.

From a mind/body standpoint, the psoas is the major muscle which is activated during the fight or flight response, when we respond to stimuli with primitive, primal survival instincts. It is spoken of as the muscle of the soul in Daoist healing traditions. A healthy psoas is linked to our ability to thrive, blossom, and become ourselves fully. Our self expression, self actualization, and speaking our truth, are all emotional aspects of the psoas. And for this reason, along with the physical importance, it serves us well to create awareness around our psoas.

Now that we know more about this important muscle, you may be wondering how you can maintain a healthy psoas. The key is focusing on a deep release of this muscle. It can only lengthen once it has been released. Yoga can be very helpful in aiding the release of the psoas. The simplest pose I would recommend to begin to gain awareness around the psoas would be a simple low lunge. Bend your left knee to a ninety degree angle, and take your right leg back behind you with your knee on the floor. Press the right shin and top of the right foot into the floor and release the tailbone down toward the floor. Even out the hips and lift the chest and you will feel the right side of your psoas in the stretch. Lifting arms overhead while in a low lunge may be tough on the joints during pregnancy. Once you are postpartum and ready for more work, if you lift the arms overhead and move the upper back into a small backbend, you will find even more sensation arise within your psoas. The key to finding release in this muscle is to practice moving through yoga poses using undulating movements, move the spine in a wave like motion, and focus on long exhalations. A gentle or restorative yoga practice will serve you best on your journey toward releasing the psoas.

In so much of our lives we are on go-go mode, and the psoas never gets a chance to release. As we sit for long periods, the muscle contracts and continues to remain engaged even though our bodies are inactive. As you move through pregnancy, and prepare for the intensely primal experience of giving birth, it is a great time to build awareness around the psoas muscle. What I love about the practice of yoga is that it offers us an opportunity for deep awareness within the body, as well as building awareness around how our mind influences our body. Try one of the yoga classes at Thrive to experience a practice designed specifically to support you during your pregnancy. If you’ve recently given birth, you are welcome to attend my Saturday morning Pre/Post Natal class with your pre-crawling baby. Taking time to unwind and recharge is crucial for a healthy pregnancy, and to find balance as a mother. Your psoas will thank you for it!

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Holistic Childbirth Prep Workshop, Staff, Thrive Birth Talk

Storytelling For Birth, Family, and Community

In our home, stories have a special place in our daily and seasonal rituals. As we gather nightly for dinner, we go around the table, first sharing what we are grateful for and then sharing the stories of our day. We might talk about a moment of tension, a friendship forged, a duck family spotted. After dinner and dishes, we retire to the couch for story time. My partner might tell a classic from memory, or I might retell a traditional folktale while he plays the guitar and my daughter contributes sound effects.

Stories weave our lives together by giving us an opportunity to share our vulnerabilities and accomplishments. We feel heard and supported when we might have felt alone or isolated before sharing. As listeners, we sit in silence, absorbing the ebbs and flows of a narrative taking shape.

Stories also serve to give us a place in our family’s history, as well as our larger community and culture. As Autumn darkens our days and we hang our holiday lights, we gather to tell stories of our ancestors, friends, or family members that have passed. We speak their names to honor their place in our history. For my daughter’s birthday, I open the day by telling her the story of her birth. This is a complex story and every year I carefully build in more of the nuances. It is not lost on me that her birth was shaped by, while simultaneously standing in contrast to, the media’s representation of birth and a woman’s body. It’s important to me that her first experience of birth takes root between her and I, connecting us, like an invisible umbilical cord.

I believe that our stories can take seed in our beings. We hold them tenderly in our bones and body, sometimes dearly, and sometimes in angst. Over the two days in which my labor unfolded, I became deeply connected to all the reproductive experiences and narratives that were shaping my daughter’s birth and my birth as a mother. My reproductive experiences will, no doubt, affect my daughter’s reproductive experiences. The reproductive experiences that we have lived as women affect our births at a multigenerational level. One of the ways that we can positively harness our past and future is to become mindful storytellers, because telling our stories is an act of honoring our transformations.

At Thrive, we have ongoing classes and events that honor the art and power of Story. I teach our Holistic Childbirth Education Workshop, where you will hear the story of the Hormones of Love and the Landscape of Labor. On December 5th, we’ll be throwing a storytelling gala for professionals and families, Stories From the Birth Room. We’ll be joined by doctors, midwives, and other professionals who will share their own stories, some sorrowful, some hilarious, all victorious in the act of transformation. In January, our beloved yoga teacher Sara Woll will lead mamas in finding balance between fear and bliss in her Truth Telling Circle. You can also join Sara in her Prenatal Yoga and Community Tea Time class, or Lyla Moore’s Prenatal and Postpartum yoga classes, where pregnant people and new mothers gather to expand and deepen connection.

If you have a story to share, please let us know. We appreciate the wisdom we gain as we sit to listen to you.

Warmly, Kelly Gray, Center Coordinator, Kelly@ThriveBirth.com

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Thrive Birth Center Blog

A Workshop for Birth Professionals: Caring Without Carrying

Preventing and Resolving the Accumulation of Work-Related Stress with Tina Stanley, L.C.S.W

For most of us who make our living working with pregnant, birthing and postpartum women, it is a true labor of love. For sure, few of us are becoming wealthy doing it! And whether we are midwives, doulas, childhood educators, nurses or psychotherapists, and whether we are veterans or raw beginners, self-care is an ongoing challenge and learning experience.

Most advice about self-care focuses on boundaries and the kind of self-care that relates to prioritizing one’s own needs: eating well, getting enough sleep, exercise, pampering, etc. Those are valid and important. Other advice suggests that it’s better to care less about our clients and their experiences, as a kind of self-protection; that a kind of “professional distance” is necessary to avoid burnout. Though there is a certain grain of truth in this, this approach can lead to a hardening or numbing that is itself likely to make our work unsatisfying. It is our caring that makes the work meaningful, satisfying and effective. But caring doesn’t mean merging or being “codependent”. And caring doesn’t mean that there aren’t situations where it’s necessary to respond or act without being overwhelmed by emotion.4f90aa948231a.preview-620

In this blog and upcoming course, I’m advocating working with clients with an open heart while nurturing an ongoing self-awareness about when our caring turns into carrying. When we are able to care without carrying, the experiences, thoughts, emotions, and reactions that are invoked in our work life can flow through us, leaving us unburdened. There’s a Zen saying about living life like a clean burning flame that leaves behind neither smoke nor ash.

When this is working well, we can “bless and release” each client and move forward without accumulating a weight of unresolved stress. When this isn’t working well, the accumulation of work-related stress brings to my mind an image of a woman carrying a sack of stones on her back. These stones of unresolved, unprocessed, undigested residue can be created in a variety of situations – for example; the frustrations of working within institutions, self-criticism or guilt about things we did or didn’t do, client situations that trigger our own past traumas, etc.

Every so often, we may need to pause, check to see what’s in that sack and sense into how to let go of carrying unnecessary weight. In addition, we can develop the proactive ability to keep from adding stones to the sack in the first place.

In the upcoming course on October 14, in a safe, supportive environment, we will explore how to access guidance from our inner worlds to process, release, and prevent this kind of accumulated weight that can easily lead to burnout, compassion fatigue, or secondary traumatization. Together we will create a simple healing ceremony. I hope you’ll be interested in learning more and invite you to give yourself the gift of this course. I welcome your questions or comments.

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Thrive Birth Center Blog

The Wisdom of Water Birth

IMG_4251 copyWhen a laboring woman steps into the birth tub the atmosphere changes, voices quiet and the softness of her body is noticeable.

Midwives have known for decades that warm water is one of the most powerful tools we have in reducing pain and tension in child birth. And yet, in the medical model of care, we are still seeing fear and resistance to letting women soak their bodies in water during labor and birth.

Recently, I was in Indonesia meeting with an Obstetrician and his group of students at a local hospital. We were discussing the differences between maternity care in the U.S. verses Indonesia. He asked, somewhat startled, “You don’t do water birth do you?” I replied, “Of course, more than half of the births I attend are water births.” His jaw dropped a little and he said, “You let babies eat their mom’s poop!” The table erupted in laughter. It was funny, but it also reflected that the medical world is still in the dark about the safety and benefits of hydrotherapy in birth.

The majority of hospitals in California will allow a laboring Mama to get in the shower for short periods between of time while being connected to a hospital bed for electronic fetal monitoring. Rarely are you able to be in active labor in the shower, and if you are blessed to find a hospital that offers a birthing tub, it is unlikely that you will be allowed to birth in it.

Midwives are skillfully trained in the art of monitoring fetal heart tones in any position, in any room. We use water proof hand held dopplers which allows us to keep a close eye (or ear) on your baby while you are in the tub.

There are many myths revolving around the risks of water birth. The primary myth is that the baby will take a breath underwater and aspirate fluid into the lungs. Rather, a healthy baby that has been thriving during labor and born into the water will be perfectly safe and will not inhale water due to the design of their throat. The larynx has 5 times more taste buds then the tongue does, which allows it to interpret solutions as they hit the back of the throat. As the solution passes the larynx the taste buds will signal the glottis to automatically close, while at the same time swallowing anything in the mouth. This automatic response is called the Dive Reflex. All healthy active babies have one. Indeed, it is believed that infants are born with this reflex so that they can easily breastfeed and not inhale milk. IMG_4449 copy

Midwives have known about the wisdom of water for a long time. By facilitating mobility and reducing stress related hormones, while at the same time increasing endorphins (which neutralize pain and encourage a trance like state during labor), midwives have have seen and experienced the following benefits of water birth:

•  Enables the mother to assume any position which is comfortable for labor and birth
•  Speeds up labor
•  Reduces blood pressure
•  Gives mother more control of body
•  Provides significant pain relief
•  Promotes relaxation
•  Conserves her energy
•  Reduces the need for drugs
•  Gives mother a private and protected space
• Causes the perineum to become more elastic and relaxed, reducing the incidence and severity of tearing and the need for an episiotomy and stitches
•  Reduces cesarean section rates and transports to the hospital for pain management 

•  Encourages an easier birth for mother and a gentler welcome for baby

It is a common belief that because babies have been happily floating in warm water for the last 40 weeks or so that birthing a baby into the water ensures a smooth and gentle transition into life with gravity. These babies are less likely to be stressed by a harsh environment. They are more likely to be born into their Mama’s hands, quietly, gently, and peacefully. IMG_4418[1] copy

Of course, there are situations that are not ideal for a water birth. Each mama and each baby are different and require individualized care to create a birth plan for you.

For more information about water birth or the benefits of laboring in water, contact Thrive. We are more then happy to discuss your birthing options!
Love, Bee Lauher, LM, CPM

*For more information hiring a birth photographer who can take photos similar to the beautiful photos taken at Thrive Birth Center, please contact Seana Burglund and see her lovely website here. Here is what one mom had to say about having Seana as a photographer at her birth:
“This is more than talent and intuitive skill. It is passion in the raw, and years of effort brought to a beautiful fruition….It takes a certain person; one who was simply born to comfort, guide, and capture so precisely the journey of pregnancy, birth, and motherhood. Seana is exactly that.”
~Liz